Reggae/World

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Celtic Thunder
Celtic Thunder presents... Emmet Cahill's Ireland a collection of Irish classics that have been passed down from generation to generation from celebrated Irish tenor and member of Celtic Thunder Emmet Cahill. Emmet Cahill's Ireland offers the very best of the traditional Irish repertoire. Song selections include: "I'll Take You Home Again Kathleen," "An Irish Lullaby," "My Cavan Girl," "Macushla," and more.
Celtic Thunder
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Tinariwen

Tinariwen

Elwan

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Tinariwen
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Bob Marley & The Wailers

Bob Marley & The Wailers

Live! [3 LP]

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Bob Marley and the Wailers were at the peak of their artistic powers when they arrived at the Lyceum London for two shows on July 17 and 18, 1975, having just released Natty Dread the year before and about to unleash Rastaman Vibration on the world. The Rolling Stones mobile studio was on hand to record both shows, with seven songs from the second released as Live!, in December of that same year. Live! will now be released on vinyl and digital including the two full shows for the first time.
Bob Marley & The Wailers
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Celtic Woman
Celtic Woman has a remarkable twelve-year legacy of introducing the most talented singers and musicians from Ireland onto the world stage. Voices Of Angels showcases the angelic voices of Susan McFadden, Mairead Carlin, Eabha McMahon and introduces the breathtaking new Celtic violinist Tara McNeill. The Voices Of Angels (Manhattan/Caroline) album contains some of the most popular songs from the Celtic Woman repertoire along with several previously unrecorded tracks, all with stunning new orchestral arrangements recorded with the 72-piece Orchestra of Ireland.
Celtic Woman
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Zomba Prison Project

Zomba Prison Project

I Will Not Stop Singing

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Follow-up release to the Grammy-nominated album "I Have No Everything Here" by the Zomba Prison Project, once again produced by Grammy winner Ian Brennan (TV on the Radio). Album recordings of inmates at a dilapidated prison in Milawi, Africa. Their recordings have brought international attention to prison injustices.
Zomba Prison Project
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Lee 'scratch' Perry
Dub reggae legend Lee Scratch Perry returns to the studio with a wide-ranging narrative, in collaboration with Spacewave. This Grammy-winning artist, songwriter, and producer doesn't hesitate with his unexpurgated commentary on his spirituality, good and evil, the human condition, and aliens. Featured are reggae, dub, dubstep, acid jazz, and electronic music and music influences. Special guests include Subatomic Sound System, The Groovematist, and Phloboi.
Lee 'scratch' Perry
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Richard Bona Mandekan Cubano

Richard Bona Mandekan Cubano

Heritage

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Fans call him ''The African Sting,'' critics call him a pro. Originally from Cameroon, Richard Bona remains true to his roots on Heritage , his 8th album as a leader and the first one with his Afro-Cuban band ''Mandekan Cubano.'' An energetic, life affirming and truly fantastic album, it explores the alchemy of African rhythms in Cuba. Richard Bona is a rare African artist to have established an unscalable reputation on an international platform, which has led to a host of awards along with his fruitful collaborations with colleagues Bobby McFerrin, Pat Metheny, Joe Zawinul, Chick Corea, Herbie Hancock, Paul Simon, John Legend and Stevie Wonder.
Richard Bona Mandekan Cubano
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Stephen Marley
Fruit of Life is the second installment of Stephen Ragga Marley's two part series, following Revelation Part I: The Root of Life (2011). Whereas The Root of Life is more a traditional roots reggae album, The Fruit of Life will utilize a diversified sonic palette to express the far-reaching impact Jamaican music has had on various genres, especially hip hop. Produced by Marley, Fruit of Life boasts 18 new tracks and features a variety of guest collaborations with Rick Ross, Pit Bull, Damian 'Jr. Gong' Marley, Iggy Azalea, Waka Flocka Flame, Dead Prez, Rakim, DJ Khaled, Busta Rhymes, Wyclef Jean, Shaggy, Black Thought (of The Roots), Bounty Killer, Sizzla, Capleton, Ky-Mani Marley, Jo Mersa and more.
Stephen Marley
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Reggae Gold 2016 / Various
Major street visibility campaigns in NYC, Miami, Toronto and London, ENG to support launch to include: Subway poster campaign Street postering, flier distribution at all major Caribbean events beginning May 15th Digital display, search and banner ad campaigns
Reggae Gold 2016 / Various
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Rough Guide
Encompassing the marabi, kwela and jive styles of mid-twentieth century urban South African music, this compilation covers the sounds, styles, assemblages and musicians that reside under the umbrella of South African jazz – from the golden age of 1960s and 1970s to the new wave of musicians in the twenty years of post-apartheid democracy. Recently re-issued releases from musician-in-exile Ndikho Xaba demonstrate the strong transatlantic dialogue between the civil rights movements in the USA and the anti-apartheid struggle through the language of jazz, with the rare single ‘KwaBulawayo’ as performed by his group The African Echoes. The Sowetan spiritual Afro-jazz of Batsumi on the track ‘Emampndweni’ contributes to the narrative of music at home during the height of apartheid in the 1970s and similarly slots into the category of undeservedly lesser-known artistry. From a period considered by some as the golden era of South African Jazz, these artists and their compositions are pertinent and vital reminders of the intrinsic link between this music and the dismantling of oppression. One of the most prominent figures of the South African jazz movement is the composer and pianist Abdullah Ibrahim, whose career spans over 50 years, including a performance at Nelson Mandela’s 1994 Presidential inauguration. Having played alongside Abdullah Ibrahim, the late Zim Ngqawana was a leading proponent of the exploration of free improvisation. While retaining South African jazz roots, Ngqawana incorporates traditional and avant-garde elements in his performances. This is prominently illustrated with the rasping vocals and volatile harmonica on the track ‘Ebhofolo’. Gospel, hip-hop and electronic music now dominate mainstream music in South Africa. But against this backdrop, the new school of South African jazzers have embraced the diversity of musical output, with many making the crossover themselves. Bokani Dyer regularly performs with fellow band member and bassist Shane Cooper, in his electronic music alias Card On Spokes. Furthermore, it could be argued the trajectory of popular music in South Africa over the last twenty years is personified by Thandiswa Mazwai, who rose to prominence through her work with kwaito group Bongo Maffin in the mid-1990s, before going on to encompass gospel and delve into maskanda and electronic music in her solo career. Featured here is Thandiswa’s take on the South African Jazz standard ‘Ntyilo Ntyilo’. South African jazz may now sit on the fringes of popular culture in South Africa, but you only have to look at the success of the Cape Town International Jazz Festival, Joy Of Jazz Festival in Johannesburg and the National Youth Jazz Festival to recognise the legacy of the pioneering musicians and the continuation of their collaborative spirit in the wealth of burgeoning jazz talent in South Africa.
Rough Guide
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Rough Guide
In the minds of most people, the psychedelic era lasted just a few short (though eventful and multi-coloured) years. As the Beat Generation of Burroughs, Kerouac and Ginsberg morphed into an LSD culture inspired by the writings of Timothy Leary and Aldous Huxley, bands like the Holy Modal Rounders and the Incredible String Band opened their minds not only to hallucinogens but to the sounds of Indian drones and middle-eastern musical modes. Soon everyone from the Yardbirds to the Monkees were using distortion, reverb and taped sounds played backwards or looped to create new rhythms and textures. But as flower power wilted, Brian Jones, Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin died young, rock bands became pompous or progressive and pop groups discovered platform heels and glitter. However, while psychedelia appeared to have flatlined in Europe and the USA, its pulse remained perfectly healthy in other parts of the world. African bands layered fuzztone guitars over highlife beats and Indian sitarists responded to the appropriation of their instrument by creating totally new soundscapes. In parts of Latin America counter-culture politics went hand in glove with musical exploration while Cambodian pop artists borrowed the psychedelic trappings of their American counterparts. This Rough Guide reflects many aspects of the global psychedelic sphere, not only from the sixties, but continuing through the decades and on into the 21st century. Latin America heads up nine of the tracks on this collection. The 1960s and 1970s were typified by activist rebellion and bands of the day communicated their passion with heavy reverb and re-imagined trad percussion gone west. Laranja Freak from Brazil make ‘Frantic Psychedelic Music’ on ‘Alergico De Flores’. Colombian dance style cumbia was also adopted by vintage psychedelic troubadours Juaneco Y Su Combo. Modern interpretations come via Chilean 'cumbia-punk-psychodelia' outfit Anarkia Tropikal. Salsa and samba are, in turn, psychedelicized by Iuri Andrade and Bacalao Men. Skipping across the Atlantic we land in Africa. The 1960s and 1970s here were defined by clashing sensibilities and political optimism. Celestine Ukwu’s classic track mixes highlife with pedal steel guitar. Tanzanian group Milmani Park Orchestra are heard on horn-heavy ‘Taxi Driver’. Victor Uwaifo’s seminal 1966 ‘Guitar Boy’ tops off the mix. During the 1970s drug culture wasn’t flooding India’s shores but the country was undergoing its own social transformation and a DIY garage band scene evolved. Ananda Shankar’s ‘Dancing Drums’ is a cult classic from this era. The Virji Shah brothers appear under their duo moniker Kalyanji - Anandji on the wonderfully bizarre ‘Cabaret Dance Music’. Cambodia’s psychedelic archive was almost eradicated during the time of the Khmer Rouge but the sounds live on via legendary balladeer Ros Serysothea and Yos Olarang’s ‘Cyclo’.
Rough Guide
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