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Akira Ifukube was born on May 31, 1914 in Kushiro, Japan. A prolific writer, he eventually created almost 400 scores. Before Godzilla propelled him to worldwide fame in 1954, he had already completed over 80 films, eighteen alone in 1952. Also acknowledged for creating Godzilla's iconic roar, Ifukube's work on this film has stood the test of time, his themes interpolated 65 years later into Bear McCreary's score for Godzilla: King of the Monsters. Over a twenty-year period (1954-75), Ifukube became the go-to composer for Toho Studio's A-list fantasy films, particularly those directed by Ishiro Honda. Frequently in demand by other studios as well, Ifukube was still able to find time to indulge in his passion to create classical compositions. Many of these were influenced by the Ainu melodies of his youth, something he often incorporated into various film scores. In 1975, Godzilla director Ishiro Honda helmed his final film in the series, Terror of MechaGodzilla (Mekagojira no gyakushu). Ifukube had also returned to the series, composing his first original score since 1968's Destroy All Monsters (Kaiju sosjingeki). The 1972 film, Godzilla vs. Gigan, or Godzilla On Monster Island (Chikyu Kogeki Meirei - Gojira tai Gaigan)was completely tracked with previously recorded Ifukube music from various sources. Terror of MechaGodzilla was to be the last film in the classic Showa series, until Toho revived the monster nine years later. Ifukube declined to return for the reboot, Godzilla 1984, and it's 1989 sequel Godzilla vs. Biollante. Allegedly unhappy with the way his music was adapted into the latter film, Ifukube agreed to return and score all subsequent films but one (Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla / Gojira vs. Supesugojira, 1994). Forty-one years after assisting in the birth of the beast, he sent Godzilla to his death in grand style for 1995's Godzilla vs. Destroyah (Gojira vs. Desutoroia).Akira Ifukube passed away just eleven years later, on February 8, 2006, at the age of 91.
Akira Ifukube was born on May 31, 1914 in Kushiro, Japan. A prolific writer, he eventually created almost 400 scores. Before Godzilla propelled him to worldwide fame in 1954, he had already completed over 80 films, eighteen alone in 1952. Also acknowledged for creating Godzilla's iconic roar, Ifukube's work on this film has stood the test of time, his themes interpolated 65 years later into Bear McCreary's score for Godzilla: King of the Monsters. Over a twenty-year period (1954-75), Ifukube became the go-to composer for Toho Studio's A-list fantasy films, particularly those directed by Ishiro Honda. Frequently in demand by other studios as well, Ifukube was still able to find time to indulge in his passion to create classical compositions. Many of these were influenced by the Ainu melodies of his youth, something he often incorporated into various film scores. In 1975, Godzilla director Ishiro Honda helmed his final film in the series, Terror of MechaGodzilla (Mekagojira no gyakushu). Ifukube had also returned to the series, composing his first original score since 1968's Destroy All Monsters (Kaiju sosjingeki). The 1972 film, Godzilla vs. Gigan, or Godzilla On Monster Island (Chikyu Kogeki Meirei - Gojira tai Gaigan)was completely tracked with previously recorded Ifukube music from various sources. Terror of MechaGodzilla was to be the last film in the classic Showa series, until Toho revived the monster nine years later. Ifukube declined to return for the reboot, Godzilla 1984, and it's 1989 sequel Godzilla vs. Biollante. Allegedly unhappy with the way his music was adapted into the latter film, Ifukube agreed to return and score all subsequent films but one (Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla / Gojira vs. Supesugojira, 1994). Forty-one years after assisting in the birth of the beast, he sent Godzilla to his death in grand style for 1995's Godzilla vs. Destroyah (Gojira vs. Desutoroia).Akira Ifukube passed away just eleven years later, on February 8, 2006, at the age of 91.
712187489515
Godzillla & Friend Vs Ghidora: Bukimisha
Artist: Ukimisha Male Chorus
Format: CD
New: Available $13.99
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Hidorah Main Title (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
2. Princess Sarno I (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
3. The Flash (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
4. Theme of Kurobe Valley I (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
5. Theme of Kurobe Valley II (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
6. Large Meteorite Discovery (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
7. Princess Sarno II (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
8. Rodan from Aso (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
9. Godzilla from the Pacific Ocean (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
10. Magnetic Force Generation
11. Two Monsters Appear in Yokohama (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
12. The Birth of King Ghidorah
13. Matsumoto City and King Ghidorah
14. Godzilla Vs. Rodan I (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
15. The Fury of the Gravity Waves (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
16. Godzilla Vs. Rodan II (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
17. Godzilla Vs. Rodan III (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
18. The Three Monsters Gather (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
19. The Three Monsters Talk (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
20. Godzilla Attacks Rodan (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
21. The Greatest Decisive Battle of the Planet I (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
22. The Greatest Decisive Battle of the Planet II (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
23. Ending (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
24. "Let's Invite Happiness" (From Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster)
25. Invasion of Astro-Monster Main Title (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
26. The P1 and Jupiter (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
27. The P1 Descends (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
28. The Mystery of Planet X (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
29. The Underground Passage (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
30. Monster Zero (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
31. The P1 Returns Home (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
32. Washigasawa and Lake Myoujinko
33. Godzilla at the Bottom of the Lake
34. Appearance of the Disc (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
35. The Electromagnetic Capsule (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
36. Back to Planet X (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
37. Arrival at Planet X (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
38. The Three Monsters on Planet X (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
39. Namikawa on Planet X (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
40. Leaving Planet X (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
41. The Earth in Utter Chaos (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
42. Monster Control I (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
43. Monster Control II (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
44. The Fury of the Three Monsters (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
45. Monster Mega-War March (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
46. Monster Mega-War (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
47. Ending (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
48. Background Music at the Star Flower Club I (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
49. Background Music at the Star Flower Club II (From Invasion of Astro-Monster)
50. The Godzilla Suite

More Info:

Akira Ifukube was born on May 31, 1914 in Kushiro, Japan. A prolific writer, he eventually created almost 400 scores. Before Godzilla propelled him to worldwide fame in 1954, he had already completed over 80 films, eighteen alone in 1952. Also acknowledged for creating Godzilla's iconic roar, Ifukube's work on this film has stood the test of time, his themes interpolated 65 years later into Bear McCreary's score for Godzilla: King of the Monsters. Over a twenty-year period (1954-75), Ifukube became the go-to composer for Toho Studio's A-list fantasy films, particularly those directed by Ishiro Honda. Frequently in demand by other studios as well, Ifukube was still able to find time to indulge in his passion to create classical compositions. Many of these were influenced by the Ainu melodies of his youth, something he often incorporated into various film scores. In 1975, Godzilla director Ishiro Honda helmed his final film in the series, Terror of MechaGodzilla (Mekagojira no gyakushu). Ifukube had also returned to the series, composing his first original score since 1968's Destroy All Monsters (Kaiju sosjingeki). The 1972 film, Godzilla vs. Gigan, or Godzilla On Monster Island (Chikyu Kogeki Meirei - Gojira tai Gaigan)was completely tracked with previously recorded Ifukube music from various sources. Terror of MechaGodzilla was to be the last film in the classic Showa series, until Toho revived the monster nine years later. Ifukube declined to return for the reboot, Godzilla 1984, and it's 1989 sequel Godzilla vs. Biollante. Allegedly unhappy with the way his music was adapted into the latter film, Ifukube agreed to return and score all subsequent films but one (Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla / Gojira vs. Supesugojira, 1994). Forty-one years after assisting in the birth of the beast, he sent Godzilla to his death in grand style for 1995's Godzilla vs. Destroyah (Gojira vs. Desutoroia).Akira Ifukube passed away just eleven years later, on February 8, 2006, at the age of 91.
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